31 May 2021 to 3 June 2021
Europe/Dublin timezone

Invited Speakers

All live lectures will be recorded and available for viewing the day after each session and after the conference so that you don’t miss a moment – no matter where you are.  


 

Rick Chalaturnyk
University of Alberta

Title: 

Impact of Multi-scale Deformations on Multi-phase Flow Considerations in Porous Media

Abstract: 

Bio:

Currently a Professor of Geotechnical Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Alberta and holds an NSERC/Energi Simulation Industrial Research Chair in Reservoir Geomechanics. Prior to joining the University in 1997, he co-founded a reservoir surveillance company called PROMORE Engineering and after joining the University, was engaged as Executive VP of Opsens Solutions, a company providing fiber-optic and non-fiber monitoring solutions to the SAGD and CO2 Storage. At the University of Alberta, Rick has established four unique, integrated, multidisciplinary university research laboratory environments called GeoInnovation Environments; GeoREF (Geomechanical Reservoir Experimental Facility), GeoCERF (Geotechnical Centrifuge Experimental Research Facility), GeoPRINT (a facility for 3D Printing of Geological Media for Reservoir Geomechanics), and GeoRMT (Geomechanical Reservoir Modelling Technology).  He has been involved in carbon capture and storage research programs since 1999 with the IEA GHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Storage and Monitoring Research Project and currently serves as a member of the scientific and engineering research committee for the Aquistore project in Saskatchewan and several other CCS initiatives. He Chaired Canadian Standards Association Technical Committee that developed the standard for the geological storage of CO2 and a member of an expert panel for the Council of Canadian Academies study “Harnessing Science and Technology to Understand the Environmental Impacts of Shale Gas Extraction Assessment”. Rick has obtained his BS and MS in civil engineering and PhD in geotechnical engineering all from the university of Alberta.


 

Andres Clarens
University of Virginia

Title: 

Reinforcing and balancing feedback loops driven by dissolution and precipitation in reactive transport through porous media

Abstract: 

In order for us to use the subsurface for novel energy applications, we need a better understanding of the feedback mechanisms wherein chemical reactions accelerate or suppress transport. Applications such as geologic carbon storage, geothermal energy production, waste disposal, or energy storage all present new opportunities for transitioning to a low carbon future but all involve the injection of fluids that interact with host rocks in complex ways. Predicting the flow of fluids in chemically and physically heterogeneously rock will be important to understanding how these technologies will perform over long time scales. Here we report on efforts to measure and then model the transport of CO2 and water through rock containing mineral silicates. These silicates react with CO2 to form multiple products some of which can be resolubilized over time and some of which are stable. The soluble species, such as carbonate, will precipitate within pore bodies, creating a reactive front and opening flow pathways over time. The stable species, which consist largely of silicate hydrates, can block flow creating negative feedback loops that will suppress long term fluid migration. Using a suite of micro- and macroscale techniques including air permeability, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), synchrotron µX-ray diffraction (µXRD), and synchrotron µX-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping I will discuss how these processes play out in diffusion dominated column experiments conducted under reservoir conditions, high pCO2, high temperature, and buffered pH. The model system is very sensitive to initial pH conditions since dissolution processes control the leading edge of the reaction front. Interesting differences are observed experimentally between polymorphs of the same calcium silicate, which support the idea that regional dissolution processes can play an important role in controlling reactions and in turn fluid transport. After precipitation begins, the ways in which certain phases grows has an outsized impact on fluid transport. The growth of calcium silicate hydrates will be highlighted in particular because it tends to occur selectively within pore throats, which gives these reactions a disproportionally important role in limiting flow. In contrast, carbonates, which crystalize out of solution more uniformly in the pore space, are much less important in controlling fluid flow. Reactive transport modeling of this system reveals the interplay between dissolution-precipitation, volume changes, and porosity/permeability. The model incorporates microporosity in the calcium silicate phases to capture the changes observed in the experimental work and this has important implications for long term fluid transport. The modeling and its comparison with experimental work provides insight about how reactive transport modeling involving complex precipitate formation can be modeled in other contexts.

Bio:

Andres Clarens is a Professor of Environmental Engineering within the Department of Engineering Systems and Environment at the University of Virginia and Associate Director of the Pan-University Environmental Resilience Institute. His research is focused broadly on anthropogenic carbon flows and the ways that CO2 is manipulated, reused, and sequestered in engineered systems. The results of his work are important for developing efficient strategies for mitigating the emissions that are driving climate change and for understanding how infrastructure systems must be adapted to meet these changes. At the largest scales, his system-level modeling work has explored the life cycle of systems in the manufacturing, transportation, and energy sectors such as renewable energy processes and waterless fracturing. In the laboratory, he is pursuing complementary research in the phase behavior and surface chemistry of carbon dioxide mixtures at high pressure to develop new ways to store CO2 underground or derive carbon-negative cements. In the classroom, Prof. Clarens engages in peer-to-peer learning at both the undergraduate and graduate level with an emphasis on developing innovative tools for teaching the fundamentals of climate change. He is the recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER award, the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund Young Investigator Award, and is a US Fulbright Fellow. He has held visiting faculty positions at Utrecht University (Netherlands) and the Technical University of Argentina. He is the chairman of the Environmental Research and Education Advisory Committee for the National Science Foundation. In his spare time, he enjoys running, backpacking, fly-fishing, and traveling. He holds a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Virginia, and an M.S.E. and Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering from the University of Michigan. 


 

Hadi Hajibeygi  
TU Delft

Title: 

"ADMIRE: a comprehensive multiscale data-informed modelling framework for subsurface energy storage"

Abstract: 

Subsurface geological formations provide giant capacities for storing renewable energy, when it is converted into green gas (e.g. hydrogen) or compressed and hot fluids. While the utilisation of subsurface formations have a long track of success in the past decades, their successful contribution in the energy transition towards a green world comes with new scientific challenges. The cyclically-stored fluids are expected not only to be stored safely, but to be reclaimed efficiently and with the same purity as in the injection phase. The critical stress also will impose restrictions on the volume, rate, and frequency of the storage cycles. In this talk, I will introduce this exciting topic to the Interpore scientific community, and describe the key ingredients of the established program at TU Delft ADMIRE project, standing for “Adaptive Dynamic Multiscale Integrated Reservoir-Earth” on addressing: cyclic hysteretic fluid transport and rock mechanics models, heterogeneity & fractures at multiple scales, and multiscale data assimilation. 

Bio:

Hadi Hajibeygi is associate professor at TU Delft. His research interests are centred around modelling, simulation and sensitivity analysis of subsurface processes for large-scale renewable energy storage, geo-energy exploitation and greenhouse gas storage. He co-leads Delft Advanced Reservoir Simulation (DARSim) and Leads TU Delft Subsurface Storage Theme. He has been co-chair of the Interpore scientific program committee for 3 years and is in the committee of EAGE-ECMOR Conference & MIT Energy Symposium. He was the most Innovative Teaching Talent of TU Delft in 2018 and holds PhD (with medal) from ETH Zurich and has experience with Chevron Energy Technology Company in California. He did his post-doctoral research at Stanford University, Energy Resources Engineering, until 2013 when he joined TU Delft. He is a Dutch National Science ViDi Laurette of 2019.


 

Christopher MacMinn
University of Oxford

Bio:

Chris is an Associate Professor in the Department of Engineering Science at Oxford. He earned his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from MIT in early 2012, after which he was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Yale Climate & Energy Institute at Yale University until joining Oxford in late 2013. His research group at Oxford -- the Poromechanics Lab -- is an interdisciplinary team of engineers, physicists, mathematicians, and geoscientists. They study a variety of problems related to flow, transport, and deformation in porous media, with applications in soft materials and subsurface engineering. The common thread running through all of their work is the combination of mathematical modelling with high-resolution experiments to develop insight into complex natural and industrial systems. Their work has attracted support from the Royal Society, the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, and the European Research Council.


 

Masa Prodanovic
The University of Texas at Austin
   

 

  Oliver Röhrle 
University of Stuttgart
 

 

Marie Rognes 
Simula Research Laboratory

Title: 

Understanding the mechanisms of the brain's waterscape

Abstract: 

Your brain has its own waterscape: whether you are reading or sleeping, fluid flows around or through the brain tissue and clears waste in the process. These physiological processes are crucial for the well-being of the brain. In spite of their importance we understand them but little. Mathematics and numerics could play a crucial role in gaining new insight. Indeed, medical doctors  express an urgent need for modeling of water transport through the brain, to
overcome limitations in traditional techniques. Surprisingly little attention has been paid to the mechanisms and the numerics of the brain’s waterscape however, and even fundamental knowledge is missing.

In this talk, we will look at mathematical, mechanical and numerical aspects for understanding mechanisms involved in the brain's watercape across scales. At the macroscale, the brain can be viewed as a poroelastic medium with multiple fluid and pressure compartments interacting. At the mesoscale, the vasculature twist and turn through the brain parenchyma: defining lower dimensional structures interacting with the brain tissue. And at the microscale, brain cells and extracellular space interact via electrical, chemical and mechanical signalling. 

Bio:

Marie E. Rognes is Chief Research Scientist and Research Professor in Scientific Computing and Numerical Analysis at Simula Research Laboratory, Oslo, Norway. She received her Ph.D from the University of Oslo in 2009 with an extended stay at the University of Minneapolis, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, US. She has been at Simula Research Laboratory since 2009, led its Department for Biomedical Computing from 2012-2016 and currently leads a number of research projects focusing on mathematical modelling and numerical methods for brain mechanics including an ERC Starting Grant in Mathematics. She won the 2015 Wilkinson Prize for Numerical Software, the 2018 Royal Norwegian Society of Sciences and Letters Prize for Young Researchers within the Natural Sciences, and was a Founding Member of the Young Academy of Norway.


 

  Zoe Shipton 
University of Strathclyde